Pseudolithos cubiformis

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KarlR
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Re: Pseudolithos cubiformis

Postby KarlR » Sat Jul 25, 2015 3:54 pm

From the pictures it looks like you have a plant in good health, Manuel, that's growing well too. It's probably just a matter of time before it flowers!
kuni12345678
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Re: Pseudolithos cubiformis

Postby kuni12345678 » Thu Sep 28, 2017 4:25 pm

I am growing both Pseudolithos cubiformis and P. miguirtinus plants outside under a covered patio. I live in Los Angeles, California near the beach and the lowest temperature is above 45F. I have only one surviving plant of each species and both plants flower. The P. miguirtinus plant sets seed every year and is pollinated by flies. This plant has produced about forty seeds from three sets of seed pods. The seed pods are from flowers that were pollinated last year. I have eight small seedlings at this time and hope they survive. I have had no success in growing seedlings in past years. I believe that the problem with all Pseudolithos plants is the fact the they are from areas of the world that have high winter temperatures and dry climates.
FaeLLe
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Re: Pseudolithos cubiformis

Postby FaeLLe » Fri Oct 06, 2017 12:07 pm

N.D. wrote:KarlR, how do you grow them? I have sown them twice, both times with the same result: They grow fine to about 1cm in size, and then they sit doing nothing, slowly and gradually desiccating to death (not collapsing quickly). I grow them in small clay pots with 75% grit/25% soil, water about once a week (less often in winter), and put them out in the sun for the summer. I suspected they did not like the winter cold (about 15C), but they don't grow in the summer heat either (under direct sun and in the shade alike).


It could be because you are germinating them in clay pots, maybe they are drying out too soon?
I understand the benefits in clay pots but find they dont work too well for me....
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Aiko
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Re: Pseudolithos cubiformis

Postby Aiko » Fri Oct 06, 2017 1:32 pm

kuni12345678 wrote: I believe that the problem with all Pseudolithos plants is the fact the they are from areas of the world that have high winter temperatures and dry climates.


My major problem was they don't like too intense light intensity when still small. And they don't like draft. I lost a lot of seedlings on sunny days (where other seedlings were still unharmed) in August, or lost them in winther when they were close to the window (where I could not excluse draft).
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KarlR
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Re: Pseudolithos cubiformis

Postby KarlR » Fri Oct 06, 2017 8:40 pm

I grew mine under artificial light, so it's difficult to compare that with a greenhouse setting. I had also never tried to grow them before, so I don't really know what definitely doesn't work.

I germinated mine in a fairly ordinary mix. Probably around 50% coco coir and the rest grit/perlite/vermiculite/pumice or similar stuff. In 5 cm square pots in a tray covered with a plastic lid (one of those mini greenhouses). Then after about 6 months they needed repotting, and I then put almost all of them in a completely mineral mix.

I probably watered ca. every 10 days on average. "Day" temperatures were probably around 30-32 C, and "night" temperatures around 15-18 C. Approx. 14 hours of light per day.

I added fertiliser with most waterings, and made sure the soil mix became thoroughly wet.

With this setup they grew very quickly, and I never lost a single one to root rot. They never had any resting period.

But, like I said, this was the first time I tried to grow them, so I don't really know whether it was the heat they enjoyed, or the regular waterings or something else, or a combination of factors.

Most of the mesembs I grew failed to thrive in these conditions (and the same with Pedios and Scleros), so it certainly isn't suitable for all succulents.
kuni12345678
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Re: Pseudolithos cubiformis

Postby kuni12345678 » Sat Nov 11, 2017 5:15 pm

I have seen hundred thousands succulents grown commercially in greenhouses located in Vista, California. The different types of succulents on such a large scale is proof that knowledge is extremely important and is not so easy to duplicate in a home environment. The lighting, temperature, water conditioning, fertilizer, pest control and constant monitoring are critical and a number of succulents that I purchased did not survive even though I live in very similar conditions. That is the problem when you purchase greenhouse grown succulents and transfer them to your growing environment.

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