Trichocereus landfillianus

For the discussion of topics related to the conservation, cultivation, propagation and exhibition of cacti & other succulents.
Forum rules
For the discussion of topics related to the conservation, cultivation, propagation and exhibition of cacti & other succulents only.

Please respect all forum members opinions and if you can't make a civil reply, don't reply!
User avatar
Peter
BCSS Member
Posts: 2527
Joined: 22 Mar 2007
Branch: None
Country: UK
Role within the BCSS: Member
Location: Shropshire

Trichocereus landfillianus

Post by Peter » Wed Oct 31, 2018 4:04 pm

There they are - those plants that you've had for many years. slowly growing, not doing much, but taking up space that you eventually realize that you need. It's an effort to get them out of the greenhouse but when you've got over just how different the place looks without them, you know that you've done the right thing.

You may get the odd expression of interest-but as often as not these are rarely followed up. So, as most humans end up in a more dignified form of landfill, I can only hope that this 50 years old pachanoi, Aloe and others will rest in peace at the council tip long before those sad looking blokes in their big black car come looking for me. The trips to the tip are likely to commence within a couple of weeks. :cry:
002.JPG
001.JPG
User avatar
el48tel
BCSS Member
Posts: 144
Joined: 04 Aug 2018
Branch: LEEDS
Country: UK
Role within the BCSS: Member

Re: Trichocereus landfillianus

Post by el48tel » Wed Oct 31, 2018 4:53 pm

Sadly true
Beginning a new journey of discovery as I grow cactus seeds and offsets for the first time; discover all kinds of wonderful plants in Cactus Nurseries; just love Echinopsis
esp
Registered Guest
Posts: 156
Joined: 20 Dec 2015
Branch: None
Country: UK

Re: Trichocereus landfillianus

Post by esp » Wed Oct 31, 2018 5:33 pm

There's a somewhat shabby Trichocereus pachanoi rather optimistically priced at £220 on ebay at the moment.
I'd certainly think your relatively splendid specimen would be worth listing to see what happened.

I'm not so sure about the demand for tree Aloes, but surely worth a go too?
rogerp
New Member
Posts: 1
Joined: 05 Oct 2018
Branch: None
Country: United Kingdom
Location: Bristol

Re: Trichocereus landfillianus

Post by rogerp » Thu Nov 01, 2018 11:02 am

I would be interested in sections of the T. (Pachanoi??) for use as graft stock if you would consider posting it. Better than seeing it go to landfill. Sadly, I can't get to Shropshire to pick it up and I don't need that much graft stock in any case!
AllanH
Registered Guest
Posts: 10
Joined: 24 Jan 2010

Re: Trichocereus landfillianus

Post by AllanH » Thu Nov 08, 2018 9:41 pm

Only just spotted this so hopefully not too late, but I'd be happy to take a trip up to Shropshire to pickup that Pachanoi. I have a few already but that's a lovely specimen & it'd be a shame to tip it.

Fortunately I'm not at the stage of considering tipping any of mine but I'd be tempted to plant them out somewhere reasonably sheltered in the wild & see if they survived, odds are slim but if it was going to the tip anyway what's the harm.
User avatar
KathyM
BCSS Member
Posts: 152
Joined: 09 Aug 2017
Branch: LEEDS
Country: UK
Role within the BCSS: Member

Re: Trichocereus landfillianus

Post by KathyM » Wed Nov 14, 2018 10:18 am

There's a lot of demand for big specimen plants at the moment, and columnar cacti seem to be particularly trendy, but the people looking to buy them are probably new collectors, houseplant enthusiasts, maybe tropical/exotic gardeners, etc.

I often see large plants fail to sell at branch meetings or maybe go for a couple of pounds at auctions because pretty much everyone else there is also a longtime cactus and succulent collector with an already-full greenhouse. I think a lot of plants are getting thrown away unnecessarily.
esp
Registered Guest
Posts: 156
Joined: 20 Dec 2015
Branch: None
Country: UK

Re: Trichocereus landfillianus

Post by esp » Wed Nov 14, 2018 10:56 am

KathyM wrote:
Wed Nov 14, 2018 10:18 am
There's a lot of demand for big specimen plants at the moment, and columnar cacti seem to be particularly trendy, but the people looking to buy them are probably new collectors, houseplant enthusiasts, maybe tropical/exotic gardeners, etc.

I often see large plants fail to sell at branch meetings or maybe go for a couple of pounds at auctions because pretty much everyone else there is also a longtime cactus and succulent collector with an already-full greenhouse. I think a lot of plants are getting thrown away unnecessarily.
I agree Kathy, people tend to be in their separate bubbles. A non-collector (perhaps an interior designer) who may want to buy a statement plant for a special location or use may not be in C&S bubbles, collectors may assume everyone who wants a 4ft Trichocereus has already got one or is willing to wait and grow their own.
User avatar
Peter
BCSS Member
Posts: 2527
Joined: 22 Mar 2007
Branch: None
Country: UK
Role within the BCSS: Member
Location: Shropshire

Re: Trichocereus landfillianus

Post by Peter » Wed Nov 14, 2018 4:52 pm

Well, here's the evidence. Thanks needed to esp, who suggested that I should try Ebay. The Trichocereus sold for £50.00 and a large Pachycereus pringlei for £77.00. To be honest, I thought that nobody would want to buy them and hadn't considered Ebay, especially after struggling to give them away here. The tree Aloe didn't sell at the price listed (£30.00), but I've now got some room on the greenhouse floor so that's where it'll be for the winter and I might try again later - but it's branching and could perhaps turn into something special.
So, thanks again esp. If you were local I'd buy you a drink but you're not, so I can't.
Tell me you're not local.....please...... (Mrs T is on her way to the off licence with the cash as I write this. More Bristol Cream and Tia Maria).
esp
Registered Guest
Posts: 156
Joined: 20 Dec 2015
Branch: None
Country: UK

Re: Trichocereus landfillianus

Post by esp » Wed Nov 14, 2018 5:37 pm

Ta Peter! I'm glad that you got a bit of recompense, and also that the plants found new homes.
I think £50 is a bargain, tbh, for such a good plant.
I'm Birmingham based so local-ish!
Ed
User avatar
Tony R
Moderator
Posts: 2515
Joined: 20 Apr 2009
Branch: DARTFORD
Country: UK
Role within the BCSS: Branch Chair
Location: Hartley, LONGFIELD, Kent

Re: Trichocereus landfillianus

Post by Tony R » Wed Nov 14, 2018 6:19 pm

Well done, Peter! Proper job!
Tony Roberts
Chairman, BCSS Dartford Branch
Treasurer, Haworthia Society
Chairman, Tephrocactus Study Group
Moderator, BCSS Forum
Kent
(Gasteria, Mammillaria, small Opuntia, Cleistocactus and Sempervivum are my current special interests)
Post Reply