GH height

For the discussion of topics related to the conservation, cultivation, propagation and exhibition of cacti & other succulents.
Forum rules
For the discussion of topics related to the conservation, cultivation, propagation and exhibition of cacti & other succulents only.

Please respect all forum members opinions and if you can't make a civil reply, don't reply!
User avatar
AnTTun
BCSS Member
Posts: 2359
Joined: 14 Jul 2010
Branch: None
Country: Croatia
Contact:

GH height

Post by AnTTun » Tue May 21, 2019 1:55 pm

I've noticed that Ralph Martin and Paul D have quite high greenhouses so this post is kinda addressed to the two of them in first place. I'm in the process of acquiring / building GH but only two shapes are available in Croatia (drop shape and 'broken roof' shape), no GH with vertical walls and all the sellers that I've contacted claimed that vertical walls can't stand the wind (in some way snow too). And I'm talking of 12x5 meters GH. Plus, 'local' GHs are not too tall, approximately 2.5 meters at top spot, which makes them rather low with skewed or rounded walls....

So guys, how come that your GHs stand tall and straight?

Also, in your opinion, how much (approximately) height adds to heating costs?

Of course, others are welcome to join the topic :)
TTcacti - C&S database software - http://www.ttimpact.hr/anttun/
User avatar
habanerocat
BCSS Member
Posts: 310
Joined: 02 Jun 2012
Branch: DUBLIN
Country: Ireland
Role within the BCSS: Member
Location: Ireland
Contact:

Re: GH height

Post by habanerocat » Tue May 21, 2019 2:41 pm

From my research commercial greenhouses tend to be tall and straight so that:

Easier access for fork lift trucks and the like.

Easier environmental control of a larger air space.

Easier add-on to in all directions.
peter831shaw
Registered Guest
Posts: 56
Joined: 03 Sep 2018
Branch: None
Country: USA

Re: GH height

Post by peter831shaw » Tue May 21, 2019 3:21 pm

Taller greenhouses increase the volume of air significantly more than the surface area (heat loss).

A large volume is much easier to control the temperature, much slower swings in temperature.

commercial video but it works to explain,


[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_cont ... M9P6uVIWlk[/youtube]


Bigger and taller is better for all the equipment as well. Which faster swings in conditions the equipment is called to work more frequently.

I think it comes to building permits..... and planning offices

Peter
Peter Shaw
RogerF
BCSS Member
Posts: 66
Joined: 25 Apr 2011
Branch: EDENBRIDGE
Country: England
Role within the BCSS: Member

Re: GH height

Post by RogerF » Tue May 21, 2019 6:57 pm

"Drop shape" I've no idea but does "Broken Roof shape refer to what we might call a Dutch greenhouse with sloping walls? I understand these offer better light transmission whilst slightly compromising internal space.

AnTTun, I'm so envious of the space you have available, most of us can only dream of having 12 x 5 metres.
Hope you find what you're looking for.
User avatar
Chris in Leeds
BCSS Member
Posts: 1427
Joined: 11 Jan 2007
Branch: None
Country: UK
Role within the BCSS: Member

Re: GH height

Post by Chris in Leeds » Tue May 21, 2019 9:13 pm

AnTTun can you show us examples of the ones available in Croatia please
Chris
BCSS MEMBER SINCE 2000 (NATIONAL SHOW)
FORUM MEMBER SINCE JUNE 2006
Interested in - TURBINICARPUS (Always looking for plants I don't have)
TEPHROCACTUS AND RELATED SPECIES
http://www.leeds.bcss.org.uk/ http://www.zone3.bcss.org.uk/
User avatar
ralphrmartin
BCSS Member
Posts: 2742
Joined: 11 Jan 2007
Branch: None
Country: United Kingdom
Role within the BCSS: Member
Location: Pwllheli
Contact:

Re: GH height

Post by ralphrmartin » Tue May 21, 2019 10:40 pm

Mine has withstood 80mph winds so far... It gets pretty windy here.

However, the stricture is supported by 10cm square cross section steel box girders, which go at least 2m down into the ground into about several 100kg concrete feet. There is one of these about every 4m along the side of each section.

My previous wooden greenhouse had sloping slides, and was structurally unsound. It splayed out, and the staging collapsed for a 2m section. I'd never get another greenhouse with sloping sides.
Ralph Martin
https://www.rrm.me.uk/Cacti/cacti.html
Members visiting the Llyn Peninsula are welcome to visit my collection.

Swaps and sales at https://www.rrm.me.uk/Cacti/forsale.php

My Field Number Database is at http://www.fieldnos.bcss.org.uk
User avatar
Jim_Mercer
BCSS Member
Posts: 1846
Joined: 24 Feb 2011
Branch: LIVERPOOL
Country: UK
Role within the BCSS: Member
Location: Liverpool
Contact:

Re: GH height

Post by Jim_Mercer » Wed May 22, 2019 11:44 am

Chris in Leeds wrote:
Tue May 21, 2019 9:13 pm
can you show us examples of the ones available in Croatia please
Google found these http://hrv.gf1.com/en/ looks like a glorified polytunnel with sheets of polycarbonate on a galvanised steel frame
User avatar
AnTTun
BCSS Member
Posts: 2359
Joined: 14 Jul 2010
Branch: None
Country: Croatia
Contact:

Re: GH height

Post by AnTTun » Wed May 22, 2019 6:10 pm

Here are the (pretty much only) two big GHs available in Croatia.

This one is from Czech Republic (or Slovakia, not sure), price with double doors, few 'automatic' windows and 8 cms polycarb coating is around 10 000 pounds for 5x12 meters. Its 2.2 m tall. Price includes delivery and 'installation'.
Staklenik1.jpg
Staklenik1.jpg (327.96 KiB) Viewed 544 times
This one comes from Latvia (or Lithuania), costs around 3000 euros for 5x12 m with 6 mm polycarb coating. Shipping included in price. Its around 3 m 'tall', but considering its shape, it really isn't.
Staklenik2.JPG
Additional problem with both is that they seem more appropriate for growing plants at ground level. Adding shelves or tables and tall cacti significantly reduces available surface.

So, I can chose between these two or build my own. The only structure that is available with vertical walls is nylon coated 'GH'. Some of them are really huge, but I doubt they would stand the wind in case I add polycarb inside metal frame....
TTcacti - C&S database software - http://www.ttimpact.hr/anttun/
User avatar
ralphrmartin
BCSS Member
Posts: 2742
Joined: 11 Jan 2007
Branch: None
Country: United Kingdom
Role within the BCSS: Member
Location: Pwllheli
Contact:

Re: GH height

Post by ralphrmartin » Fri May 24, 2019 9:55 pm

Polycarb can flex in high winds, and pop out of the frame - you need to take that into account if you build your own.

That first one looks stronger, but like I said, I wouldn't trust one with sloping sides after what happened to mine.
Ralph Martin
https://www.rrm.me.uk/Cacti/cacti.html
Members visiting the Llyn Peninsula are welcome to visit my collection.

Swaps and sales at https://www.rrm.me.uk/Cacti/forsale.php

My Field Number Database is at http://www.fieldnos.bcss.org.uk
User avatar
Apicra
BCSS Member
Posts: 1263
Joined: 11 Jan 2007
Branch: HARROW
Country: UK
Role within the BCSS: Branch Chair
Location: London, UK
Contact:

Re: GH height

Post by Apicra » Sun May 26, 2019 7:44 am

These photos reveal rather basic designs. In my view, it is essential to be able to collect rainwater and fit automatic vent openers. However, any design has to cope with the most extreme weather and both look good at shedding heavy snow-falls, which can add a great amount of weight.

If your site is not too wet, perhaps you can deep excavate the central aisle down a couple of steps, to increase the volume of air contained. If as deep as a table, then the cost of building staging can be saved.

Best wishes,
Derek Tribble
Post Reply