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Foomandoo
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Hello all

Post by Foomandoo » Sun Jan 21, 2018 2:23 pm

Steve from London

I have inherited a cuctus/succulent but unsure how to care for her. Found this site and thought i'd sign up and seek some advise.

Hopefully I'll be able to keep her alive as she is quite unique looking (AFAIK) I call her Medusa, you'll see why from the photo below (if I can work out how to attach a photo.....)

Image
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Phil_SK
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Re: Hello all

Post by Phil_SK » Sun Jan 21, 2018 9:35 pm

Hi, I don't think that's going to work... Have a look at viewtopic.php?f=47&t=165491
Phil Crewe, BCSS 38143. Mostly S. American cacti, esp. Lobivia, Sulcorebutia and little Opuntia
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rodsmith
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Re: Hello all

Post by rodsmith » Mon Jan 22, 2018 8:03 am

Welcome to the forum, Foomandoo. Yes, a photo would be very welcome.
Rod Smith

Growing a mixed collection of cacti & other succulents; mainly smaller species with a current emphasis on lithops & conophytum.
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Brian
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Re: Hello all

Post by Brian » Mon Jan 22, 2018 6:58 pm

Welcome to the forum, you have me wondering what your plant is?
Foomandoo
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Re: Hello all

Post by Foomandoo » Fri Jan 26, 2018 6:20 pm

ok, 2nd attempt at posting a piccy

note the sharpie for scale

fingers crossed...
medusa.jpg
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rodsmith
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Re: Hello all

Post by rodsmith » Sat Jan 27, 2018 8:47 am

It looks like a specimen of Aporocactus flagelliformis (Rat Tail Cactus). See this link http://www.llifle.com/Encyclopedia/CACT ... elliformis. It seems to be in rather poor condition and appears to be very etiolated (it hasn't had enough light and has grown thin). I would suggest repotting it in fresh soil around April time and keeping it in the sunniest position possible.
Rod Smith

Growing a mixed collection of cacti & other succulents; mainly smaller species with a current emphasis on lithops & conophytum.
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Phil_SK
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Re: Hello all

Post by Phil_SK » Sat Jan 27, 2018 10:46 am

I think one of the globular cacti like Rebutia muscula or Parodia scopa might be a possibility. A sunny windowsill is a must! If I wanted to save it and return it to more normal-shaped growth, I'd cut all the long thin bits off with a sharp knife at the same time, something like this.
Capture.JPG
Capture.JPG (32.81 KiB) Viewed 1272 times
Phil Crewe, BCSS 38143. Mostly S. American cacti, esp. Lobivia, Sulcorebutia and little Opuntia
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MikeT
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Re: Hello all

Post by MikeT » Sat Jan 27, 2018 10:52 am

The overall shape does suggest Aporocactus, but that has ribs running along the stems, and this plant doesn't have ribs. In addition, some of the stems are wider, where there's presumably been a bit more light when growing, and those bits seem too chunky for an Aporocactus. I rather fear it's a very etiolated Rebutia. If it is, it needs far more light to produce some more normal growth which, once large enough, could be used as cuttings to restart it.
If it doesn't have particular sentimental value, I'd class it as a candidate for the compost heap, though given time, I'm sure it would be possible to salvage something.
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BrianMc
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Re: Hello all

Post by BrianMc » Sat Jan 27, 2018 10:55 am

Judging by the diameter of the Sharpie and your plant at its thickest points I don’t think that it could possibly be an aporocactus. Which naturally trails and is a standard diameter throughout its length.

I am of the opinion(especially when taking into account the arrangement of growth at the base of the plan) that ‘it is a Rebutia or chamaecereus, which has been kept in extremely poor light. The plant is grossly etiolated. At one point things began to look up when it was placed somewhere brighter and the stems began to thicken up, only to be placed back into a dimly lit spot again where it began to stretch again as we see it now.

The plant needs good light, perhaps on a bright window sill. In time the stems should thicken up nicely. If that does the trick it might be better for the plant “long term” to trim all the branches back close to the centre of the plant and let it regrow from there, under good conditions. But that is for you to decide.
Especially interested in Mesembs. small Aloes and South African miniatures.
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New interests since 2014 include winter growing bulbs, creating Echeveria hybrids, X Trichopsis and cold hardy Echinocereus.
Foomandoo
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Re: Hello all

Post by Foomandoo » Sat Jan 27, 2018 3:45 pm

thanks for the pointers

I can see I have my work cut out for me. I would like to save her - she started off as a 1 inch high sprout.

Due to moving to a new home which gets little light along with some heating issues over the past few months she has suffered. I can see the stems have become emaciated as they were 2-3 times thicker than shown.

She used to sit in a warm porch which she obviously misses and the bulbous sections used to appear just before a growth spurt (she is 8 years old)

I have have just moved her to a window sill which get gets the most light. I have just noticed a few of the stems have detached at the base and the core looks slightly brown and 'squidgy'. I hope this doesn't signify her dying.

Would anyone recommend re-potting at this time? or any food supplements?

regards
Steve
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