Haworthia talk

For the discussion of topics related to the conservation, cultivation, propagation and exhibition of cacti & other succulents.
Forum rules
For the discussion of topics related to the conservation, cultivation, propagation, exhibition & science of cacti & other succulents only.

Please respect all forum members opinions and if you can't make a civil reply, don't reply!
pijaya
Registered Guest
Posts: 306
https://www.behance.net/kuchnie-warszawa
Joined: 02 Feb 2007

Re: Haworthia talk

Post by pijaya »

Hi Marlon
Great photos! Your plants look very healthy. The comptoniana is impressive! Do you have problem growing them in Brazil? I found many Haworthia to be quite difficult or impossible in the heat of Bangkok.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Pijaya,in Bangkok, Thailand :)Image
Marlon Machado
Registered Guest
Posts: 2391
Joined: 16 Oct 2007

Re: Haworthia talk

Post by Marlon Machado »

Hi Pijaya,

Thanks! At the moment I have my plants here in Switzerland, where I am living. But soon I will finish my PhD and I will return to Brazil.

Anyway, I did not have problems in growing haworthias when I was growing them in Brazil, exception made to some clones of emelyae and splendens, which are as difficult there as they are here, frequently losing their roots and growing painfully slow :)

Cheers,
Marlon Machado.

Institute for Systematic Botany, University of Zurich, Zollikerstrasse 107, CH-8008 Zurich, Switzerland.
User avatar
Paul in Essex
BCSS Member
Posts: 2118
Joined: 11 Jan 2007
Branch: SOUTHEND-ON-SEA
Country: England
Role within the BCSS: Member
Location: North Thames Delta
Contact:

Re: Haworthia talk

Post by Paul in Essex »

That has to be one of the best selection of photos I've seen on here. Fantastic. Many thanks.
www.oasisdesigns.co.uk

Exotic garden design.
Marlon Machado
Registered Guest
Posts: 2391
Joined: 16 Oct 2007

Re: Haworthia talk

Post by Marlon Machado »

Some more pics of my plants. Below is my second best clone of Haworthia emelyae var. comptoniana - the leaves in this clone grow a bit untidily, and the reticulation pattern in the leaves do not show up as nicely as in the other clone I showed earlier, but this plant stands out due to the numerous silver flecks it has in the leaves:
Image

Haworthia emelyae var. comptoniana. Photo: Marlon Machado.
I got this clone nearly three years ago as a small plant from ZSS (the collection of succulent plants of the city of Zurich). At the time the plant was looking a bit sick, and it had withered and yellowish leaves. But i got it anyway because of the nice pattern of silver flecks in the leaves. The plant recovered and has since put out a lot of growth. Last year I noticed that the rosette was producing some smallish leaves, and I was tempted to chop this plant up and start new plants from leaf cuttings, just to have back up plants in case the main rosette died. But I resisted the temptation, and let the plant grow a bit more. To my surprise, what it was doing was actually dividing the growing point dichotomously, and now the plant has two heads:
Image

Haworthia emelyae var. comptoniana. Photo: Marlon Machado.
The silver flecks in this clone make it look a bit intermediate between vars. comptoniana and emelyae, but it is not a hybrid but a true comptoniana clone - it has very smooth leaves and grows much bigger than emelyae (the plant is in a 6 inches - 15 cm - pot).
Image

Haworthia emelyae var. comptoniana. Photo: Marlon Machado.
Below is a plant of Haworthia emelyae var. emelyae that I bought two years ago from STC (Succulent Tissue Culture). It has the field number GM267 and is from a population intermediate between vars. emelyae and comptoniana - it has smooth leaves like comptoniana, but the plant has the size and leaf markings more typical of var. emelyae:
Image

Haworthia emelyae var. emelyae GM267. Photo: Marlon Machado.
Due to the shiny epidermis it is a bit tricky to get a photograph of the plant that does not have reflections of light:
Image

Haworthia emelyae var. emelyae GM267. Photo: Marlon Machado.
This is a quite nice plant, with nice pattern of veins and silver flecks in the leaves. In the future I will try to hybridize this clone with my flecked comptoniana clone - this cross will likely produce some very nice and robust offspring!
Image

Haworthia emelyae var. emelyae GM267. Photo: Marlon Machado.
Below is a close-up of the exquisite pattern of one of the leaves of this plant. A truly stunning natural work of art:
Image

Haworthia emelyae var. emelyae GM267. Photo: Marlon Machado.
The following plant is a different clone of Haworthia emelyae var. emelyae, this one has the field number GM256, and is of one of the 'picta' populations of Haworthia emelyae, with very nice patterns in the leaves. This is another plant that I bought from STC. You can notice in the picture below that the surface of the leaves is a bit scabrous (rough) instead of smooth:
Image

Haworthia emelyae var. emelyae GM256. Photo: Marlon Machado.
And below is yet another form of Haworthia emelyae, this one is the var. major. I got this plant from ZSS a couple of years ago. During the summer the leaves turn dark brownish in colour, contrasting quite nicely with the bluish gray windows of the leaves. Var. major has little spines all over the upper surface of the leaves, and the amount of these spines can be very dense in some clones.
Image

Haworthia emelyae var. major. Photo: Marlon Machado.
Finally, the following Haworthia is a nice hybrid between H. truncata with something else. I also got this plant from ZSS. It is a quite robust plant, and slowly offsets to form clusters of rosettes. It is a quite nice hybrid, the windows of the leaves are a bit raised instead of flat like in truncata:
Image

Haworthia hybrid, truncata X ???. Photo: Marlon Machado.
The following picture was taken with frontal illumination:
Image

Haworthia hybrid, truncata X ???. Photo: Marlon Machado.
Now the light is moved to be directly above the plant:
Image

Haworthia hybrid, truncata X ???. Photo: Marlon Machado.
And finally the light is moved in order to illuminate the plant from behind. Illuminated this way the window areas of the leaves just shine:
Image

Haworthia hybrid, truncata X ???. Photo: Marlon Machado.
Another photograph of the plant being illuminated from behind. This is how the plant looks when placed in a windowsill :)
Image

Haworthia hybrid, truncata X ???. Photo: Marlon Machado.
And yet another picture:
Image

Haworthia hybrid, truncata X ???. Photo: Marlon Machado.
The leaves are very rough due to numerous spines on the surface, both on the windows and on the sides of the leaves:
Image

Haworthia hybrid, truncata X ???. Photo: Marlon Machado.
Does anybody know if the above hybrid has a cultivar name? Bill?

Cheers,
Marlon Machado.

Institute for Systematic Botany, University of Zurich, Zollikerstrasse 107, CH-8008 Zurich, Switzerland.
User avatar
Bill
Posts: 8524
Joined: 11 Jan 2007
Branch: None
Country: Wales
Location: Pwllheli North Wales

Re: Haworthia talk

Post by Bill »

Nice pics Marlon, the truncata X is not one I recognise as a named one, there are even more unnamed ones than named ones.

It's not too disimular to this one of mine:
_______________________________________________________________________________
Haworthiad Editor

Mainly Haworthia and Gasteria, a few other South African succulents and the odd spiky thing.
Patrick
BCSS Member
Posts: 1342
Joined: 20 Aug 2007
Branch: SOMERSET
Country: Portugal
Location: Alentejo, Portugal

Re: Haworthia talk

Post by Patrick »

Beautiful plants again. Does anybody know a good source of Haworthia in the UK? (not too many weird hybids:).) I have not done an extensive search but most of the nurseries I find on the net don't seem to do much haworthia and I'd really like to get some more.
Patrick. Small varied collection of North American, Mexican and Andean Cacti. Variegated Agaves and Echeveria. Developing a succulent garden in Portugal. Joined Somerset BCSS and forum in 2007.
User avatar
Bill
Posts: 8524
Joined: 11 Jan 2007
Branch: None
Country: Wales
Location: Pwllheli North Wales

Re: Haworthia talk

Post by Bill »

Hi Patrick

Have a gander at my gallery on the link below and if you see anything you want, send me a PM and I'll see what I have. I have not got spares of everything, some are slow to offset, but I do have some of the commoner stuff ready to go and others I may be able to find or put you name on an offset. I really should do a list.
_______________________________________________________________________________
Haworthiad Editor

Mainly Haworthia and Gasteria, a few other South African succulents and the odd spiky thing.
Patrick
BCSS Member
Posts: 1342
Joined: 20 Aug 2007
Branch: SOMERSET
Country: Portugal
Location: Alentejo, Portugal

Re: Haworthia talk

Post by Patrick »

Thanks Bill, I'll do that when I get a chance.
Patrick. Small varied collection of North American, Mexican and Andean Cacti. Variegated Agaves and Echeveria. Developing a succulent garden in Portugal. Joined Somerset BCSS and forum in 2007.
User avatar
Lindsey
Registered Guest
Posts: 3302
Joined: 11 Jan 2007
Branch: None
Country: UK
Role within the BCSS: Non-Member
Location: Surrey, SE England

Re: Haworthia talk

Post by Lindsey »

Is there an online key for identification of Haworthias? Please post a link if anyone knows of one.
Ever hopeful, trying to grow plants from arid sunny climates in the UK!
Lithops, Haworthia, Adromischus, other south African succulents including Ceropegia and some Crassula.
User avatar
Bill
Posts: 8524
Joined: 11 Jan 2007
Branch: None
Country: Wales
Location: Pwllheli North Wales

Re: Haworthia talk

Post by Bill »

Other sources

Joyce Cocozza http://www.cocozzacollection.org.uk/

John Pilbeam http://www.cactus-mall.com/connoisseurs ... lents.html

Europe Reliable Suppliers

Ingo breuer http://www.haworthia.info/

Francois Hoes http://users.skynet.be/fhoes/rsasucculents/

There are others but these are ones I used with no problems. I will be putting a load of seed in soon, but they are not the fastest plants to get going.
_______________________________________________________________________________
Haworthiad Editor

Mainly Haworthia and Gasteria, a few other South African succulents and the odd spiky thing.
Post Reply